Calendula Flowers 

 

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Calendula or as mostly known by marigold is a much beautiful and amazing flower with many medicinal and cosmetic uses.

Its common name is marigold, golds, garden marigold. Its botanical or Latin name is calendula officinalis.

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Calendula, or pot marigold, is native to the Mediterranean countries.

It was used since a very long time ago by ancient civilizations as topical ointments and washes for wounds and ulcers. The ancient Romans used calendula to treat scorpion bites and soldiers in the American Civil War found it helped stop wounds from bleeding.

Some American physicians of the nineteenth century considered calendula helpful in treating stomach ulcers, liver complaints, conjunctivitis, and superficial wounds, sores, and burns.

 

The parts used are the flower petals and the herb. Only the deep orange flowered variety is of medicinal use.

 

Throughout the ages, tinctures made from calendula blossoms have been used to treat headaches, toothaches and even tuberculosis.  The ancient Romans used calendula to treat scorpion bites and soldiers in the American Civil War found it helped stop wounds from bleeding.

It is used as infusions, extracts, and ointments with the petals by folk medicine healers in Europe to induce menses, produce sweat during fevers, and to cure jaundice.

 

 

Used historically as "poor man's saffron," in different foods to give a beautiful color and a flavor.

 

Calendula flower consists of the dried flower heads or the dried ligulate flowers (ray florets) of C. officinalis.

Its main constituents include an essential oil, triterpene glycosides and aglycones, as well as carotenoids pigments, calendulin, and polysaccharides.

Uses

Mostly it has medicinal uses, although it can be used in the kitchen.

 

Medicinal uses.

It has many medicinal uses .It acts as a stimulant and diaphoretic.

 

It is used as infusions, extracts, and ointments with the petals by folk medicine healers in Europe to induce menses, produce sweat during fevers, and to cure jaundice.

 

 Calendula flower preparations were observed to be anti-inflammatory and astringent. Calendula tinctures, ointments, and washes have been used to notably speed the healing of burns, bruises, cuts, and the minor infections that they cause. Calendula is a popular salve and cream ingredient because it decreases the inflammation of sprains, stings, varicose veins and other swellings and soothes burns, sunburn, rashes and skin irritations.

 The internal and topical use of calendula flower for inflammation of the oral and pharyngeal mucosa has been noted in some research. It is gentle enough to be applied as a tea to thrush in children's mouths. 

It was also approved externally for poorly healing wounds. Specifically, herbal infusions, tinctures, and ointments are used to respond to skin and mucous membrane inflammations such as pharyngitis, dermatitis, leg ulcers, bruises, boils, and rashes.

Other activities include an increase of glycoprotein, nucleoprotein, and collagen metabolism at wound sites; and antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antiparasitic properties.

The infusion or tincture helps inflammatory problems of the digestive system such as gastritis, peptic ulcers, regional ileitis and colitis.  Calendula has long been considered a detoxifying herb, and helps to treat the toxicity that underlies many fevers and infections and systemic skin disorders such as eczema and acne.  The herb is also considered cleansing for the liver (promotes bile production) and gallbladder and can be used to treat problems affecting these organs. 

It is used as a healing mouthwash for gums after tooth extraction.
 a calendula flower, when rubbed into a bee or wasp sting, is known  to relieve pain and reduce swelling.        

Calendula has a mild estrogenic action and is often used to help reduce menstrual pain and regulate menstrual bleeding.  The infusion makes an effective douche for yeast infections.  

 

Culinary uses

Used historically as "poor man's saffron," calendula adds both color and flavor to some foods, typically rice and chowders. It was prevalent in European market places during the Middle Ages and was a common soup-starter. Today, petals are sometimes added to salads.


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